New Year's resolutions for dogs and cats

Having trouble sticking to your New Year’s resolutions? Getting your dog or cat involved in your goals and intentions will help you stay committed!

Many of us make New Year’s resolutions with the best of intentions – but we all know how that goes. Sometimes, it seems like we take better care of our pets than ourselves, so making a New Year’s resolution with your animal companion may increase the likelihood of following through! Here are a few suggestions that’ll help you and your pet start the year off on the right foot!

Exercise your pet daily

One of the most popular New Year’s resolutions, exercise is a great way to keep your pet active and healthy and help with weight control. And it helps you get those extra steps in! Resolve to taking a daily walk with your dog around the neighborhood and playing with your cat around the house. Exercise is always more fun when you do it with a friend – especially a four-legged pal!

Treat healthy

If your pet is a little chubby, resolve to start using a standard measuring cup to consistently control calorie intake. While snacking between meals is just as much fun for you as it is for your furry friend, treats should only be given in moderation. Most vets recommend that treats make up less than 10% of your pet’s total daily calories.

Brush daily

Resolve to brush your cat or dog every day. Doing so will remove excess hair helping to keep it off you and your furniture. It will also stimulate blood flow and distribute natural oils making his coat look shinier and healthier. If you’re already brushing your pet’s hair regularly, why not start brushing their teeth, too? Ninety percent of pets over three years of age have some degree of periodontal disease. Daily brushing can help reduce tartar and dental disease and increases overall health. Routine brushing can also increase the time between dental cleanings which require anesthesia and may prevent loss of your pet’s teeth as they get older.

Go back to school

If you find it difficult to carve out free time with your dog or cat, consider a more structured environment. Take or retake a training or obedience class with your pet. A refresher course for both of you will help reinforce and maintain good behavior.

Start a pet fund

As your pets get older their medical needs may increase significantly. A great idea for a resolution is to start a pet fund now and direct deposit money into it every month. If you start when your pet is young, you will have a nice nest egg later. You will be able to continue making good medical choices without needing to worry about financial constraints.

Get pet identification

If your pet does not have proper identification or needs updated identification because you’ve moved, get it now. ID tags can be made simply at most pet stores. You may also wish to consider a permanent form of identification, such as a microchip.

Make memories!

It is never too late to start a pet photo album. As our pets become seniors or after they have passed, we regret not having more pictures to remember them by. Make it your resolution to create a pet photo album so you can have a lifetime of memories to look at and share.

Wishing you and your four-legged family members a safe and happy year!