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Tuesday, September 22, 2020

What can I do to control my dog’s chronic UTI problem?

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Q.I have a four-year-old spayed female Pembroke Welsh corgi. The last two years we have battled a chronic UTI. She has had numerous cultures that come back as e-coli and has been on and off Clavamox the last two years. She has undergone an ultrasound, vaginal scope, blood tests, and x-rays which showed no underlying cause. The vets felt that the cause was a hooded vulva. She had surgery to correct the problem, but the UTI is still present.

For the last 13 or 14 months I fed her a raw meat diet (Dr. Pitcairn). We recently went to see two more vets and they were very much against a home cooked or raw diet. I was instructed to use Science Diet, canned salmon dog food, and add two teaspoons of apple cider vinegar and salmon oil plus a product by Purina that is supposed to help the digestive system, along with an herbal pill. I tried this and it didn’t work.

Currently, Wrigley is taking one amoxycillian at bedtime to control the UTI. I had heard that oregano oil might help. We need help because I really do not want her living on antibiotics. Plus, I want to go back to making her dog food. The vets that told me stop doing that, and also told me not to feed her carrots or her other regular veggie and fruit treats, other than little pieces of banana.

 

A.I have no problem with you going back to making Wrigley’s food or even giving her a raw diet. You can also address this chronic condition with some remedies and nutraceuticals. Oregano oil has proven to be effective as it has anti-bacterial properties. Olive leaf extract is another choice. The product we use in my clinic is Olivet by Vetri-Science Labs. The herbs uva ursi and dandelion are two of the more common ones used to address kidney and bladder problems, including infections. Personally, I like UT Strength, also by Vetri-Science. Homeopathically, we use Uri-Cleanse by BHI, or Urinary Aid by Professional Complementary Health Formulas. If testing the urine pH proves it is too alkaline, acidifiers such as cranberry extracts or vitamin C in the ascorbic acid form could also help.